Photo
engineeringhistory:

Shirley Ann Jackson, the first African-American woman to earn a Ph.D. from MIT. Jackson conducted research at Fermi National Accelerator and Bell Labs on theoretical physics, solid state and quantum physics, and optical physics and was awarded 40 honorary doctorates.

engineeringhistory:

Shirley Ann Jackson, the first African-American woman to earn a Ph.D. from MIT. Jackson conducted research at Fermi National Accelerator and Bell Labs on theoretical physics, solid state and quantum physics, and optical physics and was awarded 40 honorary doctorates.

(via shychemist)

Quote
"“Well,——me,” he said. “A ——ing wizard. I hate ——ing wizards!”
“You shouldn’t —— them, then,” muttered one of his henchmen, effortlessly pronouncing a row of dashes."

I love this joke, (Mort, Terry Pratchett)

(Source: itmakesmefeelsomop, via dduane)

Quote
"The absence of evidence is not the evidence of absence."

— Carl Sagan, Cosmos  (via scienceshenanigans)

(Source: asapscience, via scienceshenanigans)

Chat

Classic Literature

  • Main Character(s): I'm gonna do a thing
  • Everyone Else: Don't
  • Main Character(s): I'm doing the thing
  • Everyone Else: *dies*
  • Main Character(s): Oops *dies too*
  • Teachers: Meaningful
Photo
shakespeare-mobil:

golden-d:

shakespeare-mobil:

golden-d:

shakespeare-mobil:

"To use flash or not to use flash, that is the question."

Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to squint atThe shade and dimness of outrageous darknessOr to use flash against a sea of shadows,And, with good lighting, end them?

To flash; to see,No more; and by ‘to see’ to say we endThe squinting and the thousand blurry formsThis shot is heir to; ‘tis illuminationDevoutly to be wished.

To flash, to see,To see, and to expose; Aye, there’s the rub,For in that aperture what prints may come,When we have shuffled to that vacant darkroom,Must give us pause. 

There’s the respectThat makes calamity of photographs.For who would bear the one unsteady hand,The blurry thumb, the subject’s contumely,The pangs of misused zoom, focus’ delay,The insolence of lens caps, and the strainImpatient Photoshop of the cameraman takes,When he himself might his one good shot makeWith no bare flashbulb?

shakespeare-mobil:

golden-d:

shakespeare-mobil:

golden-d:

shakespeare-mobil:

"To use flash or not to use flash, that is the question."

Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to squint at
The shade and dimness of outrageous darkness
Or to use flash against a sea of shadows,
And, with good lighting, end them?

To flash; to see,
No more; and by ‘to see’ to say we end
The squinting and the thousand blurry forms
This shot is heir to; ‘tis illumination
Devoutly to be wished.

To flash, to see,
To see, and to expose; Aye, there’s the rub,
For in that aperture what prints may come,
When we have shuffled to that vacant darkroom,
Must give us pause. 

There’s the respect
That makes calamity of photographs.
For who would bear the one unsteady hand,
The blurry thumb, the subject’s contumely,
The pangs of misused zoom, focus’ delay,
The insolence of lens caps, and the strain
Impatient Photoshop of the cameraman takes,
When he himself might his one good shot make
With no bare flashbulb?

(via fiftysevenacademics)

Quote
"My heart suspects more than mine eye can see."

— Quintus (Titus Andronicus, Act II scene iii)

(Source: dailyshakespeare)

Quote
"We shouldn’t teach great books; we should teach a love of reading. Knowing the contents of a few works of literature is a trivial achievement. Being inclined to go on reading is a great achievement."

B.F. Skinner, American psychologist (via whats-out-there)

Wow. I agree with Skinner on something.

(via keishasmith)

Tags: reading
Quote
"Female job applicants with children are 44 percent less likely to be hired for a job than are childless women with similar qualifications. Fathers, by contrast, are 19 percent MORE likely to be hired than are comparably qualified men without children."

— "Getting a Job: Is there a Motherhood Penalty?" American Journal of Sociology, 2007 (via checkprivilege)

(via keishasmith)

Text

runecestershire:

cartopathy:

engrprof replied to your post “I desperately want to know what happened to the Gaunt wordplay and the…”

I’ve read some reviews that said this translation is excellent at replacing it with Arabic wordplay - it’s quite a witty translation if you know Arabic. There are times when a small portion of the audience laughs - presumably those who know Arabic.

I also got to wondering what they did with the religious stuff, especially Bolingbroke going off to the Crusades as propitiation for Richard’s death. That struck me in such a difficult way watching last night, a Palestinian theater group in England talking about an English king who made up for the death of his cousin by killing Muslims.

But they could have cut those lines and I wouldn’t even know. 

They might have cut it, or shifted it to something culturally analogous. But if they left it, it’d have made for a particularly thuggy Bolingbroke. And since they didn’t do the subsequent plays, they have a bit a leeway for Bolingbroke’s story arc which obliges him to be a tolerable king. The impression I got from that production is that, unlike in actual history or in Shakespeare’s sequence of plays, the country was totally doomed under Bolingbroke and that he was going to make hash of everything. That we’d go straight into Henry VI and Richard III territory without the Henry IV and Henry V stuff as a sort of reprieve, that this was only the beginning, and it can only go downhill from here.

I would very much like to know what precisely went on in the translated text at that point, though, so if there’s anyone out there who knows classical Arabic…..

I wondered if they left it in as comment on how the US, etc., are always coming along and saying we’re going to achieve peace in the Middle East when we’re a big part of the problem.  The arrogance fits well with their interpretation of Bolingbroke.

Would love to know!  We need an English translation of the Arabic translation!

Text

How to Ride a Werewolf

fireandshellamari:

finishingschoolbooks:

image

image

image

image

image

image

Now remember, a lady rides sidesaddle, NOT astride. Your mother would be in hysterics at the very idea that a daughter of hers would ride a werewolf astride! Why, next you’ll be showing ankle…

I may have found my new favourite thing.

(via thursday-next)

Quote
""I feel," said Blind Io, "that if we wanted people to fly, we would have given them wings."
“We allow broomthtickth and magic carpeth,” said Offler.
“Ah, but they’re magical. Magic… religion… there is a certain association. This is an attempt to subvert the natural order. Just anyone could float around the place in one of these things.” He shuddered. “Men could look down upon the gods!”
He looked down upon Leonard of Quirm.
“Why did you do it?” he said.
“You gave me wings when you showed me birds,” said Leonard of Quirm."

That last line is so powerful.

Terry Pratchett, The Last Hero

(via randombrethren)

(via nimblermortal)

Text

bibliophilianapologist:

Working on a paper in the library late at night  and watching the crowd of fellow students dwindle like ‘we few, we happy few, we band of brothers’

(via shakesankle)

Text

thegrapesofangst:

Wow potatoes are just really good. Like they’re so delicious and so versatile. It’s amazing. Never change potatoes. Never change

Photo
laughingwiththestars:

socialintroverts:

“Hardly anybody ever writes anything nice about introverts. Extroverts rule. This is rather odd when you realise that about nineteen writers out of twenty are introverts. We have been taught to be ashamed of not being ‘outgoing’. But a writer’s job is ingoing.” ― Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin  ~  Born:  October 21, 1929

laughingwiththestars:

socialintroverts:

“Hardly anybody ever writes anything nice about introverts. Extroverts rule. This is rather odd when you realise that about nineteen writers out of twenty are introverts. We have been taught to be ashamed of not being ‘outgoing’. But a writer’s job is ingoing.”

― Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin  ~  Born:  October 21, 1929

(via willywaldo)

Text

I think one reason we like Shakespeare is he makes his plays all mixed up good and bad like life actually is. 

My two remaining cats are confused and worried.  We’re sad. 

But at the same time, my son got his forge working last night and actually got some metal reshaped.  It’s a great accomplishment and made him happy.  I think banging on metal will be a great therapy for him.

But man, there sure are a lot of cats on Tumblr!

Tags: personal