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detrea:

The premise of minimum wage, when it was introduced, was that a single wage earner should be able to own a home and support a family. That was what it was based on; a full time job, any job, should be able to accomplish this.

The fact people scoff at this idea if presented nowadays,…

Tags: politics
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"Is it good? It ain’t Shakespeare - but then Shakespeare wrote Titus Andronicus, so you tell me."

— John Scalzi, Redshirts (via eighttwotwopointthreethree)

(Source: invite-me-to-your-memories, via eighttwotwopointthreethree)

Tags: scalzi
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Nothing like getting sick first day of big meetings

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"Dammit Sherlock, I’m a doctor, not an engineer!"

— John at some point, probably

(Source: astudyinrose)

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letterstomycountry:

Mr. Rogers makes us all look terrible.
WHYY Media

letterstomycountry:

Mr. Rogers makes us all look terrible.

WHYY Media

(via impling)

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"I go down to the shore in the morning
and depending on the hour the waves
are rolling in or moving out,
and I say, oh, I am miserable,
what shall—
what should I do? And the sea says
in its lovely voice:
Excuse me, I have work to do."

— Mary Oliver, from the book A Thousand Mornings

(Source: fishingboatproceeds)

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hell with it I’m totally gonna repost this

shredsandpatches:

The Great Big List of Known Early Modern History Plays
Plays marked with an asterisk (*) no longer extant. Plays marked with a plus sign (+) exist only in manuscript.

I got the titles from this site and from Benjamin Griffin’s Playing the Past — I just split it up by reigns. “Early modern” basically means “between the premiere of Gorboduc in 1562 and the closure of the public theaters in 1642.” Also, I’ve included hyperlinks where e-texts exist. (There are way more of them than when I originally posted the list in 2006.)

Read More

Thank you!

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poorshadowspaintedqueens:

theboyfallsfromthesky:

runecestershire:

shredsandpatches:

runecestershire:

shredsandpatches:

runecestershire:

Imagine how awesome it’d be if Shakespeare, with all his stuff about kingship and his knack for writing really interesting women, had done a play about Boudica?

Well, his occasional collaborator John Fletcher wrote one. Maybe he didn’t want to step on Fletcher’s toes. ;)

(also holy hell i didn’t know this page existed. YESSSSS)

*screams and runs around in circles*
THANK YOU!

(I really need to brush up on my playwrights who are not Shakespeare or Marlowe or Stoppard or Beckett)

YOU DOOOOOOO. Early modern drama is the best, even beyond Shakespeare and Marlowe. Although I haven’t read this particular play myself, so I can’t tell you if it’s any good or not. Fletcher wrote it around the same time Shakespeare was writing Cymbeline, and now I’m picturing them having Roman Britain parties or something.

(also, I should repost my list of known early modern English history plays on tumblr)

AAAHHH!!! There’s a Hengist plaaaayyy!!!!

If you ever are looking for suggestions that are not Shakespeare or Marlowe or Stoppard or Beckett (who are awesome playwrights with really impressive volumes of work but) let me know because I have suggestions for just about any period or genre. :)

OMG YES, THERE IS A HENGIST PLAY.

Hengist King of Kent by Thomas Middleton. He also wrote The Revengers’ Tragedy, that play of the mouth-dissolving poison. This one purports to be about Saxons and Romans and is on so much crack. We did it at my departmental play reading one term and nobody knew what to do when Hengist’s wife had an entire monologue while on fire. The monologue, admittedly, was about the fact that she was on fire.

Early modern history plays are ridiculous and delightful.

Oh, my. I wonder why that monologue hasn’t become a standard audition piece?

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dark-haired-hamlet:

swanjolras:

like, it’s really important that hamlet is prince of denmark— it’s really important that he’s not just any random dude whose father has been murdered. “lord hamlet is a prince, out of thy star, this must not be” is important, and “imperial jointress to this warlike state” is important, and “there’s something rotten in the state of denmark” is important, and though i have no great love for him, fortinbras is important

because hamlet is— it feels wrong to call it political, as if there’s some standpoint shakespeare was trying to advocate for, and it feels wrong to call it about power, since it’s also about family, and grief, and depression, and lots of other things

but soooo much of it is the claustrophobic terrifying enclosure of elsinore, the invisible weight of the structure of the whole court, the environment of doublespeak and dual identities— claudius is never referred to as “claudius” in dialogue, only as “the king”— rosencrantz and guildenstern’s implications that hamlet is only sad because he didn’t get the throne, hamlet’s slow shocked realization that a king can end up in the guts of a beggar and when you’re dead it doesn’t make any damn difference

hamlet isn’t just anybody, he’s an heir, he’s the king’s son, denmark’s a prison and he is trapped in it because he is the prince of denmark. not a lord, not a general’s son. he comes from power and he has lived in power all his life and that is important.

also, because i’ve gone 5 minutes without mentioning cal shakes hamlet:

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Pictured: Clint Ramos’ set model for Hamlet, the majority of which is taken up by an empty swimming pool. Ramos and director Liesl Tommy took much inspiration from photos of abandoned mansions and palaces—places that were post-power but pre-ruin. (x)

waaaaghhhhhhghghgghghgh

     (via danishprince)

YES! Because Fortinbras only conquered Denmark because the king was ignoring his responsibilities. Would Hamlet have done better if he had inherited it as he should have? Fortinbras thought so and he was in a position to know.
I hate when they cut out the politics like it’s not important. It matters.
And what’s wrong with a 4 hour play anyway?

(via eighttwotwopointthreethree)

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theboyfallsfromthesky:

runecestershire:

shredsandpatches:

runecestershire:

shredsandpatches:

runecestershire:

Imagine how awesome it’d be if Shakespeare, with all his stuff about kingship and his knack for writing really interesting women, had done a play about Boudica?

Well, his occasional collaborator John Fletcher wrote one. Maybe he didn’t want to step on Fletcher’s toes. ;)

(also holy hell i didn’t know this page existed. YESSSSS)

*screams and runs around in circles*
THANK YOU!

(I really need to brush up on my playwrights who are not Shakespeare or Marlowe or Stoppard or Beckett)

YOU DOOOOOOO. Early modern drama is the best, even beyond Shakespeare and Marlowe. Although I haven’t read this particular play myself, so I can’t tell you if it’s any good or not. Fletcher wrote it around the same time Shakespeare was writing Cymbeline, and now I’m picturing them having Roman Britain parties or something.

(also, I should repost my list of known early modern English history plays on tumblr)

AAAHHH!!! There’s a Hengist plaaaayyy!!!!

If you ever are looking for suggestions that are not Shakespeare or Marlowe or Stoppard or Beckett (who are awesome playwrights with really impressive volumes of work but) let me know because I have suggestions for just about any period or genre. :)

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runecestershire:

the-dork-lord-voldormort:

When I was younger, I never thought I’d be sitting here on this stupid site crying about Shakespeare ships. And yet look at what’s happening

When I was younger, I didn’t imagine the Internet would turn into such a place where I’d find so many like-minded people to cry over Shakespeare with me.
And yet look at what’s happening.

rune:  #here lies a fandom digg’d their graves with weeping eyes 

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(Source: questionall, via impling)

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nimblermortal:

What, in the name of an unspoken magpie god, is a slave doing with a sword that cannot be bested?

So how did he get captured?  In his sleep?

Or did they sell themselves into slavery?  Seems like if I had a sword that couldn’t be bested, I’d be all “done with the slave thing - bye.!”

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runecestershire:

dark-haired-hamlet:

runecestershire:

You know, that Fortinbras has Horatio shot thing is precisely the sort of horrible doomy thing I’d come up with in one of my perverse AU-ruining moods and I really like the idea that that showed up in an actual production >:)

I didn’t think Hamlet could possibly get any more tragic than it already is, but by killing off Horatio like that you add a whole other layer of misery.

         (horatio-at-elsinore)

The way I read it there are two ways this could play out.

The first way is what popped into my mind the instant I read that post. Horatio makes a promise to Hamlet, fully intending to keep it, and then he can’t because Fortinbras’ thugs drag him kicking and screaming away from Hamlet’s body and BAM, no more Horatio.

The second way, equally tragic but rather different, is pretty much what horatio-of-elsinore describes above. It’s all said and done, and Horatio just sits there with Hamlet’s body and waits for it. This I think would work best if it’s Fortinbras himself who pulls the trigger.

Then there’s way 2b, where Horatio is so intent on Hamlet that he doesn’t even notice what’s going on around him, and never sees it coming.

Which way works best would really depend on your Horatio and your Fortinbras and your Hamlet and how things had played out up to this point.

Yeah, I don’t really ship Hamlet/Horatio either. They are really good friends. I think the play shows that during the play, Hamlet is so damaged by grief and the ghost that he isn’t really capable of loving anyone. But the fact that Ophelia and Horatio stick by him so long makes it seem like he really had a gift for friendship before then.